OLD CARSblog

Old Cars: Are They Worth The Repairs?

This is a touchy subject for many car owners…

Maybe it was your first car, back when you were a spritely 17-year-old. Maybe it was your first family vehicle when your children came along. Maybe you’ve spent so much on repairs for it over the last few years that getting rid of it seems an impossible and backwards task. Knowing what to do with your car when it gets old, fails MOTs and causes more hassle than you afford, is hard.

It’s easy to become emotionally attached to a vehicle, but it’s also easy to become infuriated and nervous about your vehicle. On one hand, you may love it, and not want to see it become obsolete, but on the other hand, the huge expense of repairs and your lack of mobility in it’s time of failure, make it a huge burden. Each year when the MOT comes around, you cross your fingers and pray to the high heavens than it will pass through with no issues, but each year, your wish is not granted; in fact, it invariably gets worse.

As cars get older, repairs often become replacements, and finding older parts that may have gone out of manufacture is not too hard, but their limited numbers push up the price and make it uneconomical. How often have you heard people say ‘it’s not worth fixing’, well, it’s true. Say your car, which may be chock-full of sentimental memories, is only worth £300 to a buyer, and the failed MOT signals £400 worth of repairs are needed, what do you do?

Car repairs need consistency

In the meantime, while your car is not yet old, you should take preventative steps to offset the effects of old age. Much like people, we must take good care of ourselves to last longer. For cars, one thing you can do is find a caring and trustworthy garage, such as In Town

Automotive. We have been looking after cars, new, used and old, for several years and have built up a great reputation in that time. We know the science of car repairs and our team are well versed in the art. Going to a good garage is only half of it, the other half is going to the same garage every time, and giving the technicians a chance to learn your car and understand how it should run. This is why we have an incredible amount of returning customers, most of whom know that a good garage can increase the lifespan of their vehicle.

Old car repairs = Old car issues

Older cars are likely to suffer long term, serious issues, such as corrosion, steering rack wear, dangerous leaks, ABS braking repairs, catalytic converter faults and serious engine malfunctions. And, with old cars, it’s not only the issues they currently face, but the impending ones too, like tyre wear, brake pads etc.

For many older car owners who are caught in the issue of whether to keep or scrap their faulty vehicle, the life that they’ve shared together is likely to be a deciding factor. Those with fond memories will find it harder to see it scrapped, but once the MOT test is failed and the decision taken not to get it repaired, it will be almost impossible to sell. Quite often, having the cash ready and available to plug up a sinking ship is the deciding factor, and for most, a bad investment is not one that they follow.

Admit defeat, wave goodbye

So, when you admit defeat and concede that the old car is beyond repair, what can you do? Well, you get it scrapped, that’s what you do. Unless your car is particularly valuable as spares and repairs, perhaps as a collector’s edition, it is likely to be crushed and melted for materials. There are businesses out there who will pay you for you vehicle,  and will even collect it from the garage where it failed its MOT test, and do the dirty work for you. You might only get £50, but at that point, many older car owners are relieved to be done with a huge financial burden.


Want to build a long term relationship with a trustworthy garage? Call us today on 01604 666700

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